KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

 

Pascal Maussion

Professor

Université de Toulouse,

France

Research Interest

 

Biography

Prof. Pascal Maussion received the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the Institut National Polytechnique de Toulouse, Université de Toulouse, Toulouse, France, in 1990. He is a Full Professor with the Université de Toulouse and a Researcher with the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique Research Unit, LAPLACE, LAboratory for PLAsma and Conversion of Energy in CODIASE (Control and Diagnostic of Electrical Systems). His research activities deal with the control of power converters for induction heating or energy efficiency improvement in renewable energy systems, life cycle assessment in renewable energy systems, diagnosis of electrical systems, such as drives and lighting, and design of experiments as an optimization tool in control and diagnosis. He is currently a Vice President of the Institut National Polytechnique de Toulouse, Toulouse, France, for International Affairs.

Keynote Talk

Frugal Innovation for Rural Electrification

In many developing countries, the lack of electricity in rural areas is still a key issue for millions of people. The reuse of discarded components in renewable energy systems, based on the frugal innovation concept (low tech), has been identified as a solution for rural electrification in countries where renewable resource is plentiful and mostly for low-income people.
The installation of renewable energy production systems is an interesting solution for the electrification of villages not connected to the grid. The recent development of applications using small hydroelectric power stations associated with a photovoltaic generator allows the exploitation of natural energy sources, with relatively easy production and transformation. My work ultimately concerns a pico hydro system of a few tens or hundreds W, which will be hybridized by a photovoltaic generator with dc storage. The whole system is expected to supply a remote village (lighting, refrigerators, TV and radio).
The solution of the rich countries consists in using new components and dedicated to this use, manufactured for these functions (“solar” batteries, dedicated static converters, synchronous generators with magnets, asynchronous generator with double supply as in wind turbines…). Thus, we are studying the possibility of re-using discarded components (in whole or in part) to make the same solutions for generating energy from renewable sources and to reduce their global footprint. The list of equipment includes in particular lead-acid car batteries, homemade pico hydro turbines and discarded inverters. Moreover, our project is based on the existence of smartphones in families living in isolated rural villages, which will be used to supervise the design, configuration and control of energy production units.
Octavia A. Dobre

Octavia A. Dobre

Professor

Memorial University,

Canada

Research Interest

 

Biography

Octavia A. Dobre is a Professor and Research Chair at Memorial University, Canada. Her research interests encompass various wireless technologies, such as non-orthogonal multiple access and intelligence reflective surfaces, blind signal identification, as well as optical and underwater communications. She has co-authored over 300 refereed papers in these areas. Dr. Dobre serves as the Editor-in-Chief (EiC) of the IEEE Open Journal of the Communications Society. She was the EiC of the IEEE Communications Letters, as well as Senior Editor, Editor, and Guest Editor for various prestigious journals and magazines. Dr. Dobre was a Royal Society Scholar and a Fulbright Scholar. She obtained Best Paper Awards at various conferences, including IEEE ICC, IEEE Globecom, and IEEE WCNC. Dr. Dobre is a Fellow of the Engineering Institute of Canada and a Fellow of the IEEE.

Keynote Talk

From Cognition to Intelligence in Communications Networks

Since Mitola’s idea of cognitive radio which arose close to 2000, significant advancements have been made toward applying intelligence in communications networks. While 2020 marks an important milestone in the deployment of 5G wireless networks, planning to deliver enhanced mobile broadband, massive connectivity, ultra-reliability and lower latency, beyond 5G wireless (B5G) aims to provide a major paradigm shift from connected things to connected intelligence. Besides the synergy between communications and computing, B5G seeks to integrate sensing and support a pervasive intelligence. After 20 years, we can state that the idea of extending cognition to artificial intelligence (AI) in the field of communications has arrived. The next decade is crucial for research and development activities to achieving a native AI-based 6G network, capable of not only advancing the digitalization of vertical industries, but also of addressing human challenges through a connected world. This talk will provide a brief overview of advances in transitioning from cognition to intelligence in communications networks, with emphasis on the features of 5G, as well as on the envisioned 6G wireless. It will discuss the intelligence integration supported by mobile edge computing in both terrestrial and vertical dimensions of emerging communications networks, along with modalities to developing a deep learning network. Furthermore, applications of machine learning techniques to communications will be presented, e.g., to the identification of the signal types in both wireless and optical communications areas. Finally, the talk will highlight research directions for the application of AI to the field of communications.

Dong-Choon Lee

Professor

Yeungnam University,
South Korea
Research Interest

Power converter design and control, renewable energy and grid connection, AC machine drives, EV chargers, and DC
microgrids and DC distribution systems

Biography

Dong-Choon Lee received his B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea, in 1985, 1987 and 1993, respectively. He was a Research Engineer for Daewoo Heavy Industry, Korea, from 1987 to 1988. He has been a faculty member in the Department of Electrical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Korea, since 1994. He was a Visiting Scholar in the Power Quality Laboratory, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA, in 1998; the Electrical Drive Center, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, ENG, UK, in 2001; the Wisconsin Electric Machines and Power Electronics Consortium, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA, in 2004; and the FREEDM Systems Center, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA, from September 2011 to August 2012.
He served as the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Power Electronics (SCI(E) registered) of the Korean Institute of Power Electronics (KIPE), from January 2015 to December 2017. In 2019, he served as the President of KIPE as well as the organizing committee chair of ICPE 2019-ECCE Asia.

Keynote Talk

Advanced Multilevel Converters for Medium-Voltage Applications

Over the past few decades, multilevel converters have been rapidly explored for medium-voltage and high-power industrial applications, such as motor drive and grid-connected systems, in order to increase the efficiency, power quality, power density, reliability, and cost-effectiveness. For instance, several variants of active neutral-point-clamped (ANPC) converters have been developed and commercialized. Some challenges in control of neutral-point voltages and floating capacitor voltages should be addressed, particularly in multiphase structures with higher number of level. Other issues such as mitigation of common-mode voltage (CMV) and fault-tolerant operation also demand the solutions which do not adversely affect the system volume and cost.
When it comes to modularity and scalability, the modular multilevel converters (MMCs) have been widely recognized as proven and established solutions. In order to address the issue of large voltage ripple in standstill and low-speed operation, several strategies have also been proposed, such as injection of CMV and circulating current into the three-phase legs or integration of auxiliary components to suppress voltage ripples in sub-module (SM) capacitors without injecting the CMV.
This talk will cover an overview of these advanced multilevel converters with an emphasis on several key topologies such as classical and hybrid ANPC converters, hybrid-clamped converters, and MMCs. With a focus on the topological properties, modulation techniques, voltage-balancing control schemes, CMV mitigation, SM voltage-ripple reduction, and fault-tolerant operation, this talk will provide a broader view on the prospects of advanced multilevel converters for medium-voltage applications.
 

Masayuki Fujita

Professor

University of Tokyo,

Japan

Research Interest

 

Biography

Masayuki Fujita is a Professor at The University of Tokyo and a Visiting Professor at Tokyo Institute of Technology. He is also the Vice President of SICE, Japan, in 2020. He was the Research Supervisor (Program Officer) for Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST) during 2012-2020. He received the Dr. of Eng. degree in Electrical Engineering from Waseda University, Tokyo, in 1987. Prior to his appointment at The University of Tokyo, he held professor/faculty appointments at Tokyo Institute of Technology, Kanazawa University and Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology. His research interests include passivity-based control in robotics and robust control. He is the coauthor of the book "Passivity-Based Control and Estimation in Networked Robotics" (Springer, 2015). He was the IEEE CSS Vice President Conference Activities and a member of the IEEE CSS Board of Governors. He served as the General Chair of the 2010 IEEE Multi-conference on Systems and Control (MSC). He also served as an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, the IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology, Automatica, and Asian Journal of Control. His recent service includes the Award Chair of the IFAC Control Engineering Practice Paper Prize for 2017-2020 and a Steering Committee Member of the IFAC Cyber-Physical & Human Systems. He is a recipient of the 2008 IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology Outstanding Paper Award, was a Plenary Lecturer of the 54th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (CDC) in 2015, and was an IEEE CSS Distinguished Lecturer during 2017-2019. He is a Fellow of IEEE and SICE.

Keynote Talk

Passivity-Based Control in Robotics: Networks, Vision and Human

Passivity concepts have been a topic of interest widely in systems and control. In particular, they have provided unified fundamental tools for a variety of robot control problems. In this talk, I shall describe new developments in passivity-based control in robotics; namely in cooperative control of robotic networks and in visual feedback with visual motion observer. First the talk begins with output synchronization for networked robotics, consisting of nonlinear passive dynamics and of rigid body networks on SE(3). Then it focuses on systematic construction of visual motion observer for three-dimensional dynamic motion estimation, which enables us to synthesize visual feedback control. By exploiting passivity concepts further, an emerging topic of human robotic-networks teaming is also examined and discussed. Rich experimental case studies with hands-on robotic testbeds are effectively demonstrated throughout the talk.
 

Toru Namerikawa

Professor

Keio University,

Japan

Research Interest

  • Robust control
  • Distributed and cooperative control
  • Mechanism design and their application to power network systems
  • Intelligent transportation systems

Biography

Toru Namerikawa received the B.E., M.E and Ph.D of Engineering degrees in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Kanazawa University, Japan, in 1991, 1993 and 1997 respectively. In 2009, he joined Keio University, Yokohama, Japan, where he is currently a Chair Professor at Department of System Design Engineering, Keio University, Yokohama, Japan. He held visiting positions at Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich in 1998, University of California, Santa Barbara in 2001 and 2008, University of Stuttgart in 2008 and Lund University in 2010. He received 2014 Pioneer Technology Award from SICE Control Division and 2017 Outstanding Paper Award from SICE.

Keynote Talk

Resource Allocation Control of Mobility

As a key component of the urban infrastructure system, the development of smart and intelligent mobility systems and transportation networks is strongly expected. At present, information terminals and measurement control devices are beginning to be introduced for the monitoring and control of urban infrastructure systems. In this talk, resource allocation and optimal control problems for smart transportation and mobility systems are presented. At first, the charging scheduling optimization problem of electric vehicle via game theory is discussed. The charging station determines the price to maximize its own profit from selling energy and each EV determines the energy demand to maximize the charge benefit by competing with other EVs. Then, the smart parking guidance system for urban traffic network is presented. Searching of parking lot sometimes causes traffic jam in urban traffic networks. We propose a novel parking lot allocation and a dynamical parking fee design methodology based on mechanism design.